Recent Water Damage Posts

Why quick response water damage mitigation is important

5/30/2019 (Permalink)

Water damage left unchecked will destroy subflooring causing unhealthy and dangerous living conditions.

Within Minutes

Water quickly spreads throughout your property, saturating everything in its path.

Water is absorbed into walls, floors, upholstery, and belongings.

Furniture finishes may bleed, causing permanent staining on carpets.

Photographs, books, and other paper goods start to swell and warp.

Hours 1 - 24:

Drywall begins to swell and break down.

Metal surfaces begin to tarnish.

Furniture begins to swell and crack.

Dyes and inks from cloth and paper goods spread and stain.

A musty odor appears.

48 Hours to 1 Week:

Mold and mildew may grow and spread.

Doors, windows, and studs swell and warp.

Metal begins to rust and corrode.

Furniture warps and shows signs of mold.

Paint begins to blister.

Wood flooring swells and warps.

Serious bio-hazard contamination is possible.

More Than 1 Week:

Restoration time and cost increase dramatically; replacing contaminated materials and structural rebuilding may be extensive.

Structural safety, mold growth, and bio-hazard contaminants pose serious risks to occupants.

Who prayed for rain?

2/27/2019 (Permalink)

Rain, Rain, Go AWAY!

2018 was the wettest year on record for North Carolina, with an astounding 59.2” of rain as of December 28th. All that rain brought in loads of wet crawlspace, leaky roofs and mold calls for us here at SERVPRO of Johnston County. Yet the rain just keeps on falling. Since January 1st 2019 we have already seen 7.41” of rainfall (and it’s raining again today!). As you can imagine the calls for wet crawlspaces, leaky roofs and mold just keep pouring in.

Protect your home and the health of your family by checking to make sure your crawlspace is dry. A wet crawlspace can lead to a moldy crawlspace. Mold in your crawlspace can affect the air quality in your home.

If you find that your crawlspace is wet

  1. Find where the water is coming in then find out what you can do to stop continued water intrusion. (If you need help locating the source give us a call! 919-325-2599)
  2. Make sure your gutter downspouts are moving the water away from your foundation. The use of a downspout diverter or splash block can be very inexpensive way to move the water away from your foundation.
  3. Open all the wall vents to increase airflow.
  4. If you have a vapor barrier in place, mop up any standing water and check for holes or tears.

If you’ve already taken steps to dry out a wet crawlspace and it isn’t drying after a few days, without further water intrusion, call us in. We have the equipment and expertise to dry it out and keep your home safe and dry.

SERVPRO of Johnston County

919-359-2599

Restoring Hardwoods

2/13/2018 (Permalink)

Top photo, before drying process. Bottom photo, after drying process.

Water damage to a home or business can be devastating. The quicker we can get in to take care of the issue, the better and less likely we’ll have to come in and demo. That isn’t always the most ideal option for business and home owners and can draw out the repair process. The photos of the hardwood floors attached to this blog are a perfect example of that. The homeowner called about a burst pipe on the second floor during extremely cold temperatures. Water was beginning to stand on the floor as a result. Beautiful hardwoods on the entire first floor of the home were affected. The first photo shows the floors beginning to cup from the standing water. Once we came in and extracted the water and dried the floors, tenting the floor with plastic became a focus to dry the hardwoods in order to salvage them. They then used a desiccant dehumidifier and wood floor drying units to slowly dry the floors. Slow drying prevents us from over drying the hardwoods or drying too fast. Once drying is complete, the hardwoods need to acclimate at least 30 days before they can be refinished to bring the back to their original state. The second photo is after the drying process. The hardwoods are already looking excellent and on their way back to their original state.

Preventing Frozen Pipes

1/16/2018 (Permalink)

North Carolina has been experiencing  abnormal below freezing temperatures that have never been seen, or felt, for such a long period . The 1-2 inches of snow locally in the Clayton area left everyone home for several days due to the freezing temps sticking. With the abnormally low temperatures we’re seeing, our office is getting a lot of calls about frozen pipes bursting. More snow is due today. So, before those cold temps come back let’s go over some tips to prevent your pipes from freezing.

· Remove all hoses from your outdoor faucets.

· Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.  

· Adding insulation to attics, basements and crawl spaces will help keep them warmer. Hot and cold water pipes should also be insulated in places such as garages, kitchen cabinets and bathroom cabinets.

· Let cold water drip from faucets. Even a drip can prevent pipes from freezing.

· Use electrical heating tape on exposed pipes.

· Never let your heat go below 55 degrees.

· Protect outside faucets with foam faucet covers.

If you suspect your pipes to already be frozen please call a licensed plumber to come and take the of the problem.

The drip that jumped over the pan!

5/11/2017 (Permalink)

As you see here some one didn't considered the issues involved in drip pan maintenance and was faced with many issues and discomfort until we arrived.

Hey folks,


    As I'm sure we all are aware, summer is fast approaching. That being said, I would like everyone to stay ever vigilant of the concerns that summer brings with it when considering your AC units. Surly most of you have already kicked your units into high gear and I would like to bring to your attention the things to keep in mind - my main area of focus concerning the units are: the drip pans that stop the condensation from spilling over and damaging your home. This is an easy detail to forget especially if your unit is located in the attic. This might not seem like a major issue but you can imagine it easily slipping your mind and not realizing you have a serious problem before it's too late. Soon you will have water stains on your ceilings and ruined insulation in the attic. I urge you to check your pans quite often and from time to time check the drain lines. A few minutes of your time could save you a few hundred dollars down the road.


 


Thanks for tuning in,


SERVPRO of Johnston County


 

Preventing frozen pipes this winter

1/4/2016 (Permalink)

When pipes freeze you risk ruptures and leaks that can be extremely damaging

Preventing and Thawing Frozen Pipes         

Being prepared and informed may help you to avoid the messy and often expensive issue of frozen pipes. The American Red Cross provides information and suggestions around how to prevent water pipes in the home from freezing, and how to thaw them if they do freeze.

 

 
Why Pipe Freezing is a Problem
Water has a unique property in that it expands as it freezes. This expansion puts tremendous pressure on whatever is containing it, including metal or plastic pipes. No matter the "strength" of a container, expanding water can cause pipes to break. Pipes that freeze most frequently are those that are exposed to severe cold, like outdoor hose bibs, swimming pool supply lines, water sprinkler lines, and water supply pipes in unheated interior areas like basements and crawl spaces, attics, garages, or kitchen cabinets. Pipes that run against exterior walls that have little or no insulation are also subject to freezing.
Preventing Frozen Pipes
Before the onset of cold weather, prevent freezing of these water supply lines and pipes by following these recommendations:
  • Drain water from swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.
  • Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.
  • Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located in unheated areas. Look in the basement, crawl space, attic, garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.
  • Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Newspaper can provide some degree of insulation and protection to exposed pipes – even ¼” of newspaper can provide significant protection in areas that usually do not have frequent or prolonged temperatures below freezing.
During Cold Weather, Take Preventative Action
  • Keep garage doors closed if there are water supply lines in the garage.
  • Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.
  • When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing.
  • Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.
  • If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.
To Thaw Frozen Pipes
  • If you turn on a faucet and only a trickle comes out, suspect a frozen pipe. Likely places for frozen pipes include against exterior walls or where your water service enters your home through the foundation.
  • Keep the faucet open. As you treat the frozen pipe and the frozen area begins to melt, water will begin to flow through the frozen area. Running water through the pipe will help melt ice in the pipe.
  • Apply heat to the section of pipe using an electric heating pad wrapped around the pipe, an electric hair dryer, a portable space heater (kept away from flammable materials), or by wrapping pipes with towels soaked in hot water. Do not use a blowtorch, kerosene or propane heater, charcoal stove, or other open flame device.
  • Apply heat until full water pressure is restored. If you are unable to locate the frozen area, if the frozen area is not accessible, or if you can not thaw the pipe, call a licensed plumber.
  • Check all other faucets in your home to find out if you have additional frozen pipes. If one pipe freezes, others may freeze, too.
Future Protection
  • Consider relocating exposed pipes to provide increased protection from freezing.
  • Pipes can be relocated by a professional if the home is remodeled.
  • Add insulation to attics, basements and crawl spaces. Insulation will maintain higher temperatures in these areas.
  • For more information, please contact a licensed plumber or building professional.