Recent Storm Damage Posts

Hurricane season starts Thursday: Heres how to prepare!

6/2/2017 (Permalink)

“As hurricane season approaches, it is important for community members to prepare for the possibility of severe weather,” said Barry Porter, regional CEO of the Red Cross in Eastern North Carolina. “Knowledge and preparation are some of the key elements to ensure your personal safety and to help protect your family and property.”

? Have a portable radio, cellphone, TV or NOAA weather radio on hand to monitor weather conditions. Make sure you have chargers, spare batteries or rechargeable battery packs for devices.

? Know your evacuation route and have a plan to move to another location in case of evacuation or extended power outages.

? Put gas in your car before the storm begins.

Build an emergency kit with a supply of water (one gallon per person per day); non-perishable, easy to prepare food; first aid-kit; battery-powered or hand-crank radio; flashlights and batteries; multipurpose tool; sanitation and personal hygiene items; extra clothes; copies of important documents in a zip-top bag; cellphones and chargers; extra cash; emergency contact information; blankets or sleeping bags; and a map.

? If you have pets, make sure you have a supply of water and pet food and prepare collars, leashes and carries for transport. Make sure you have rabies vaccination documents or tags and have your pet wear an ID tag, if possible.

? Homeowners who depend on well water should draw an emergency water supply in case power to electric water pumps is interrupted.

? Bring inside anything that could become a projectile in high winds. Anchor anything too big to bring inside.

? Find an interior room on the lower level of the building or home to wait out the storm unless directed to evacuate.

State Farm Insurance also recommended that people talk to their insurance agent about replacement cost coverage, flood insurance and deductibles ahead of a storm.

Officials also asked that people create an emergency plan ahead of storms, including: how to contact or find each other; setting two meeting places (one near home and another outside the neighborhood); what evacuation routes to take; pet-friendly motels and animal shelters along the route; and planning alternative routes in case roads are blocked or washed out.

Members of every household also should know the difference between a hurricane watch and a hurricane warning to be able to plan how and when to respond.

? A hurricane watch is when conditions are a threat within 48 hours. It’s time to review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued and stay informed.

? A hurricane warning is when conditions are expected within 36 hours. It’s time to complete your storm preparedness and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities.

? Tropical storm watches and warnings: Take these alerts seriously. Although tropical storms have lower wind speeds than hurricanes, they often bring life-threatening flooding and dangerous winds.

Stay informed

To follow National Weather Service reports in the Triangle, go to www.weather.gov/rah or follow your local weather service office on social media. For the National Hurricane Center, go to www.nhc.noaa.gov or find the center on social media.

[How to get severe weather alerts on your phone]

Download the Red Cross Emergency App or the ReadyNC app for weather alerts, preparation tips and important local information. For more North Carolina emergency information, go to www.nc.gov/agency/emergency-management or follow N.C. Emergency Management on social media.

Thanks folks,

SERVPRO of Johnston county

Heavy Rains

3/3/2016 (Permalink)

Heavy rains have caused all sorts of problems for folks in Johnston County that have basements. As the water tables rise, so does the pressure of water below the basement floor. So much so that water will pour right through the concrete.

This can overwhelm or short out a sump pump or cause back-up problems with ceptic systems. The result can be a basement full of water, and/or sewage. Neither is fun to deal with....

It happens, and, when it does, we're here to help...

2015 was a very wet year. 2016 is off to a similar start. Be sure to keep your eye on rising water.