Recent Storm Damage Posts

Hurricane Season

7/27/2020 (Permalink)

As a resident of a state that is on the East coast, hurricane season is something we know is on its way. We know it is from June 1st to November 30th. Even though it is a yearly occurrence, you might not always remember what you should have and know in case we are in the path of one of these storms.

  • Portable radio, cellphone, TV or NOAA weather radio on hand to monitor conditions. Make sure you have chargers, spare batteries or rechargeable battery packs for devices.
  • Know your evacuation route and have a plan to move to another location in case of evacuation or extended power outages.
  • Put gas in your car and generator before the storm begins.
  • Build an emergency kit with a supply of water (one gallon per person per day); non-perishable, easy to prepare food; first aid-kit; battery-powered or hand-crank radio; flashlights and batteries; multipurpose tool; sanitation and personal hygiene items; extra clothes; copies of important documents in a zip-lock bag; cellphones and chargers; extra cash; emergency contact information; blankets or sleeping bags; and a map.
  • If you have pets, make sure you have a supply of water and pet food and prepare collars, leashes and carries for transport. Make sure you have rabies vaccination documents or tags and have your pet wear an ID tag, if possible.
  • Homeowners who depend on well water should draw an emergency water supply in case power to electric water pumps is interrupted.
  • Bring inside anything that could become a projectile in high winds. Anchor anything too big to bring inside.
  • Find an interior room on the lower level of the building or home to wait out the storm unless directed to evacuate.

Officials also asked that people create an emergency plan ahead of storms, including: how to contact or find each other; setting two meeting places (one near home and another outside the neighborhood); what evacuation routes to take; pet-friendly motels and animal shelters along the route; and planning alternative routes in case roads are blocked or washed out.

Members of every household also should know the difference between a hurricane watch and a hurricane warning to be able to plan how and when to respond.

 A hurricane watch is when conditions are a threat within 48 hours. It’s time to review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued and stay informed.

 A hurricane warning is when conditions are expected within 36 hours. It’s time to complete your storm preparedness and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities.

 Tropical storm watches and warnings: Take these alerts seriously. Although tropical storms have lower wind speeds than hurricanes, they often bring life-threatening flooding and dangerous winds.

Stay informed!

Do you Know the Difference?

3/12/2020 (Permalink)

A photo of a hurricane as the eye of the storm makes landfall over the coast of North Carolina An outer space image of a hurricane as the eye of the storm makes landfall over the coast of North Carolina.

With hurricane season quickly approaching SERVPRO of Johnston County wanted to go over some terminology that is often used to ensure everyone understands it and is informed. Knowing the difference between a watch and a warning can help ensure you are properly prepared and reacting to the information that is being given to you.

What is the difference between watch and warning?

A hurricane watch is when conditions are a threat within the next two days. It’s time to review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued and stay informed. Think that this is a possible event to happen. 

 A hurricane warning is when conditions are expected within day and a half. It’s time to complete your storm preparedness and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities. Think that this is an expected event to happen.

 Tropical storm watches and warnings: Take these alerts seriously. Although tropical storms have lower wind speeds than hurricanes, they often bring life-threatening flooding and dangerous winds.

Stay informed!

When Lightning Strikes Your Home

7/5/2019 (Permalink)

When lightning strikes a building, the electricity often surges through a home's wiring or plumbing system, searching for the quickest possible route to the ground. The most common place for a fire to ignite is in the attic, when a lightning bolt comes through the roof or top of the house.

While staying inside your home, away from doors and windows, is the safest place to be during a storm, a couple of dangers exist inside the home when lightning is involved, regardless of whether you have lightning protection in place.

  1. Power Surges: When lightning strikes a house, the electricity often surges through a home’s wiring or plumbing system, searching for the quickest possible route to the ground. Make sure to unplug any electronics (especially valuable ones like TVs or computers), or they could be destroyed. Avoid running water during a lightning storm. You could get electrocuted if you are touching or standing near water or any electronics that are plugged into walls.
  2. Fire: When lightning shoots through a home, there’s a risk for fire. The most common place for a fire to ignite is in the attic, when a lightning bolt comes through the roof or top of the house. However, the heat from the electricity of a lightning bolt that runs through the walls inside your plumbing or wiring could start a fire as well. You may notice it immediately, or it may burn slowly inside the walls without your realizing it for some time.

 What to do if your property experiences a direct lightning strike.

  • If you see fire or smell smoke, evacuate the property immediately.
  • Call 911 and report to them that your property was struck by lightning. Do this regardless of whether or not you detect a smoke or fire.
  • The fire department will search and assess your property using specialized equipment that detects heat signatures.
  • Once your home is assessed and found to be safe, you will be able to return inside.
  • Call your insurance company and explain what has happened.
  • Call a trustworthy electrician to come out and inspect your home wiring. If you need recommendations, we’re happy to help!
  • Check your roof for damage. Whether it’s a small hole in the roof, damaged shingles, or major fire damage, SERVPRO of Johnston County has emergency response available to prevent further damage and to restore your property and make it "Like it never even happened." 

 North Carolina ranks 6th in the country for lightning strike home insurance claims. In 2018 there were 3,119 filed insurance claims for lightning strikes. The average claim was nearly $12,000. 

Hurricane season starts Thursday: Heres how to prepare!

6/2/2017 (Permalink)

“As hurricane season approaches, it is important for community members to prepare for the possibility of severe weather,” said Barry Porter, regional CEO of the Red Cross in Eastern North Carolina. “Knowledge and preparation are some of the key elements to ensure your personal safety and to help protect your family and property.”

? Have a portable radio, cellphone, TV or NOAA weather radio on hand to monitor weather conditions. Make sure you have chargers, spare batteries or rechargeable battery packs for devices.

? Know your evacuation route and have a plan to move to another location in case of evacuation or extended power outages.

? Put gas in your car before the storm begins.

Build an emergency kit with a supply of water (one gallon per person per day); non-perishable, easy to prepare food; first aid-kit; battery-powered or hand-crank radio; flashlights and batteries; multipurpose tool; sanitation and personal hygiene items; extra clothes; copies of important documents in a zip-top bag; cellphones and chargers; extra cash; emergency contact information; blankets or sleeping bags; and a map.

? If you have pets, make sure you have a supply of water and pet food and prepare collars, leashes and carries for transport. Make sure you have rabies vaccination documents or tags and have your pet wear an ID tag, if possible.

? Homeowners who depend on well water should draw an emergency water supply in case power to electric water pumps is interrupted.

? Bring inside anything that could become a projectile in high winds. Anchor anything too big to bring inside.

? Find an interior room on the lower level of the building or home to wait out the storm unless directed to evacuate.

State Farm Insurance also recommended that people talk to their insurance agent about replacement cost coverage, flood insurance and deductibles ahead of a storm.

Officials also asked that people create an emergency plan ahead of storms, including: how to contact or find each other; setting two meeting places (one near home and another outside the neighborhood); what evacuation routes to take; pet-friendly motels and animal shelters along the route; and planning alternative routes in case roads are blocked or washed out.

Members of every household also should know the difference between a hurricane watch and a hurricane warning to be able to plan how and when to respond.

? A hurricane watch is when conditions are a threat within 48 hours. It’s time to review your hurricane plans. Get ready to act if a warning is issued and stay informed.

? A hurricane warning is when conditions are expected within 36 hours. It’s time to complete your storm preparedness and leave the area if directed to do so by authorities.

? Tropical storm watches and warnings: Take these alerts seriously. Although tropical storms have lower wind speeds than hurricanes, they often bring life-threatening flooding and dangerous winds.

Stay informed

To follow National Weather Service reports in the Triangle, go to www.weather.gov/rah or follow your local weather service office on social media. For the National Hurricane Center, go to www.nhc.noaa.gov or find the center on social media.

[How to get severe weather alerts on your phone]

Download the Red Cross Emergency App or the ReadyNC app for weather alerts, preparation tips and important local information. For more North Carolina emergency information, go to www.nc.gov/agency/emergency-management or follow N.C. Emergency Management on social media.

Thanks folks,

SERVPRO of Johnston county

Heavy Rains

3/3/2016 (Permalink)

Heavy rains have caused all sorts of problems for folks in Johnston County that have basements. As the water tables rise, so does the pressure of water below the basement floor. So much so that water will pour right through the concrete.

This can overwhelm or short out a sump pump or cause back-up problems with ceptic systems. The result can be a basement full of water, and/or sewage. Neither is fun to deal with....

It happens, and, when it does, we're here to help...

2015 was a very wet year. 2016 is off to a similar start. Be sure to keep your eye on rising water.