Recent Fire Damage Posts

House Fires and What to Know

10/1/2020 (Permalink)

Home with flames through roof and windows House fire resulting in major structural damage. Flames through the roof and through the windows.

Did you know by having a working smoke detector more than doubles one's chances of surviving a fire?

House fires injure than 6,000 people each year. While this seems like a large amount of people it is important to remember there are ways to help prevent house fires from happening and can assist you in getting out of a building on fire.

  • Smoke Detectors

It is recommended that every home be equipped with smoke detectors on every floor and ideally outside of each sleeping area. Each should be tested monthly and batteries should be changed when you change your clock for Fall and Spring.

  • Fire Extinguishers

By keeping an all-purpose extinguisher (one rated for grease and electrical fires) you are helping decrease the risk of a serious, whole home, house fire. When having an extinguisher in your home it is very important to ensure every able-bodied family member is familiar with hour to properly operate it.

  • A plan to get out of your home if a fire occurs

Having an escape route can be very beneficial if a fire breaks out at your home. Have an escape route for each area of the home and a designated meeting place outside. When planning for a family with young children, be sure to teach them not to hide from fire or smoke and to go to firefighters who are there to help them. Everyone must understand that once you escape, you must never reenter a burning building–no matter what you might have left behind. Make sure to practice your escape plan periodically. It will be easier to remember in case of an emergency. Make sure to practice your escape plan periodically. It will be easier to remember in case of an emergency.

After you've planned for the family, don't forget the pets. Alert firefighters about your pets. Don't rely on window or door decals to alert firefighters–such decals are often found to be outdated. 

Children and Fire Safety

7/21/2020 (Permalink)

When it comes to children, you can never prepare enough in the event of a fire. Making sure that children know what to do and what not to do can go a long way in safety.

  • What a smoke alarm sounds like: Some children run and hide when an alarm sounds a house-fire warning. Making and practicing a house fire escape plan helps them respond appropriately to the alarm.
  • What a firefighter looks like at a fire: Show your children with the equipment a firefighter may be wearing and/or carrying. Children may hide instead of responding to their calls.
  • Escape routes: Always teach children two ways out of every room (i.e., window and door).
  • Stay low during escape: Crawl as close to the floor as possible under smoke to a safe exit.
  • Test the safety of their exit route: Use the back of the hand to test if a closed door is hot. If it is hot, use another way out.
  • Where to meet after escape: Everyone must meet at a previously designated meeting place outside the home so that firefighters know that all persons are out of the house.
  • How to call for help: Call 911 from a neighbor's home.
  • Stay out: Never go back inside a burning home to get anything such as toys, clothes or pets.

These tips are a great way to ensure your children are prepared in the event you have a house fire.

Fire Safety tips for the Holidays

11/9/2017 (Permalink)

The holiday season is an exciting time of the year for most families but that excitement can quickly be extinguished if a fire occurs in the home.  The U.S. Fire Administration says that almost 47,000 fires occur during winter holidays taking more than 500 lives.  The National Fire Protection Association and U.S. Fire Administration have found that 1 of every 22 home fires started by Christmas trees result in death and candle fires are four times likely to occur during the winter holidays.  These are only two of several frequent occurrences during the holiday season for too many families.  To help keep your family safe this season, below are some safety tips to follow.

The most common cause of household fires are from cooking.  Leaving food unattended is a big reason for this.  Before kicking off the holiday cooking season at Thanksgiving be sure to check all smoke detectors to make sure they’re working properly.  It’s also always important to keep a fire extinguisher in the home.  When you’re cooking keep all paper or plastic bags, kitchen utensils, pot holders and dish towels are kept away from the stove.  If you’re going to be cooking with a deep fryer put it at least 10 feet away from your home.

Candles, decorative lights and other seasonal decorations are a big thing for decorating around the holidays.  All items should be placed at least 3 ft from any type of heat sources.  Prior to using decorative lights check each strand for frayed or cracked wires.  Avoid hanging lights on nails or with staples as it could lead to damage to the wiring.  If you’ve had lit candles, walk around your home to extinguish them at the end of the evening.  The same goes for decorative lights. Prior to leaving your home or going to bed always unplug all lights.

Christmas tree fires are more likely to occur in January after the Christmas season.  However, you can never be too safe following these steps to ensure your homes safety.  Make sure your tree has fresh, green needles that don’t break easily.  Keep your tree fresh by continuing to keep it watered.  Never use candles that are lit to decorate your tree.  Always unplug your tree lights before leaving for home or going to bed.  Have a sturdy tree stand to ensure your tree is stable and won’t fall over.

From our SERVPRO family to yours, we're wishing everyone a safe and joyous season! 

Holiday, candle and Christmas tree fire safety

12/21/2015 (Permalink)

Facts about home holiday fires

  • One of every three home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.
  • Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious. On average, one of every 31 reported home structure Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 144 total reported home structure fires.
  • A heat source too close to the tree causes roughly one in every four of Christmas tree fires.
  • More than half (56 percent) of home candle fires occur when something that can catch on fire is too close to the candle.
  • December is the peak time of year for home candle fires.

Source: National Fire Protection Association

Holiday fire hazards

11/25/2015 (Permalink)

As the holiday season approaches and families gear up for decorating their homes and hosting large gatherings of friends and family, George Hogshead of SERVPRO® of Johnston County reminds homeowners to take note of some sobering statistics about home fire safety from the National Fire Prevention Association:

  • Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home structure fires. The three peak days for home cooking fires are Thanksgiving, Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.1
  • Candles fires peak in December. The top three days for candles fires are Christmas Day, Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve.2
  • “These statistics are a serious reminder of how the excitement of holiday entertaining can quickly turn into a life-altering fire or even a tragic injury or death,” says Hogshead. “While glowing candles and elaborate meals set the stage for a great holiday get-together, homeowners need to exercise extra care in controlling the dangerous potential for fires.”

    According to the NFPA3, unattended cooking is by far the leading cause of home cooking fires, with frying posing the greatest fire risk and electric ranges posing a higher risk than gas ranges. Range top cooking in general started the majority of home cooking fires and caused 86 percent of related civilian deaths for the reporting period.

    While incidents of candle fires peaked in 2001 and have been falling since, candles are still one of the top 10 causes of U.S. home fires, according to the NFPA. As with cooking fires, unattended or abandoned candles account for a large portion of candle fires–almost 20 percent–but the most frequent cause of candle fires is placing the candle too close to something that can burn, like curtains, decorations or furniture.

    “It’s easy to see why cooking and candle fires both peak during the holiday season,” says Hogshead, “and it’s also easy to see why homeowners need to take extra care when decorating their homes or entertaining. A moment’s inattention at the stove or a guest repositioning a candle on a tabletop may be all it takes to turn the festivities into a fight to save property and lives. While our business is fire and water damage restoration and we stand ready to help at a moment’s notice if disaster does strike, our sincere hope is that our friends and neighbors will enjoy a fire-free and festive holiday season.”

    For more fire prevention tips and information about fire and water damage restoration services, please visit www.SERVPRO.com. For more information on SERVPRO® of Johnston County, please contact George Hogshead at (919) 359-2599 or GHogshead@nc.rr.com.

    1 http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/causes/cooking

    2 http://www.nfpa.org/research/reports-and-statistics/fire-causes/candles

    3 http://www.nfpa.org/safety-information/for-consumers/holidays/put-a-freeze-on-winter-fires

    About SERVPRO®

    Founded in 1967, the SERVPRO® Franchise System is a national leader and provider of fire and water cleanup and restoration services and mold mitigation and remediation. SERVPRO’s professional services network of nearly 1,700 individually owned and operated Franchises responds to property damage emergencies ranging from small individual disasters to multi-million dollar losses. Providing coverage in the United States and Canada, the SERVPRO System has established relationships with major insurance companies and commercial clients, as well as individual homeowners.

    National Fire Prevention Month

    10/7/2015 (Permalink)

    Servpro of Johnston County fire tips

    Stay safe with these fire tips from SERVPRO of Johnston County